How To Treat Shock

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Overview Of Shock

  • Shock takes place when the circulation system within your body fails to transmit blood to all the other vital organs.
  • With shock, the flow of blood is too low to meet the demands of the body. Vital areas of the body are deprived of oxygen.
  • This results in damage to the limbs, brain, heart, and lungs. Loss of blood from any wound can also cause severe shock.

Signs And Symptoms Of Shock

  • Weakness, fainting and feeling shaky;
  • Feeling agitated and confused;
  • Pale skin, lips or fingernails;
  • Cool and clammy skin;
  • Fast, deep breathing. Fragile, but rapid pulse;
  • Nausea, queasiness and severe thirst;
  • Bloated pupils; and
  • Loss of consciousness.
    Shock takes place when the circulation system within your body fails to transmit blood to all the other vital organs.
    Shock takes place when the circulation system within your body fails to transmit blood to all the other vital organs.

Causes Of Shock

  • A heart attack
  • Severe or unexpected blood loss from a wound or severe illness. Bleeding can take place within or outside the body.
  • A large decrease in body fluids (dehydration), especially following a severe burn.

First Aid For Shock

  • Look for a response. Give the casualty rescue breaths or CPR as required.
  • Place the casualty horizontal, face-up, but do not move them if you suspect a back, neck, or head injury.
  • Elevate the casualty’s feet. Make use of a box, etc. Do not elevate the feet or shift the legs if the hip or leg bones are cracked. Keeps the casualty laying flat.
  • If the casualty vomits or has difficulty breathing, elevate him or her to a semi-sitting position (if there is no neck, back, or head injury). Or, rotate the casualty on his or her side to avoid choking.
  • Release any stiff clothing. Keep the casualty warm. Cover the casualty with a warm coat, blanket, etc.
  • Observe for a response. Repeat as required.
  • Do not offer any food or fluids. If the casualty wants water, dampen their lips.
  • Comfort the casualty. Make him or her as relaxed as you can.

Related Video On Shock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjOLn768RWk

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